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The latest in keyword research

Many site owners are scrambling to find the best ways to deal with Google’s latest algorithm tweaks. With the goal of prioritizing naturally strong content that provides value to searchers, Google has altered its algorithm to put more emphasis on quality and less on semantics.
Long story short: As we’ve noted previously, Google removed the ability for businesses to see which key terms are being used to find their site. To improve privacy and draw better search results for its customers, the company removed search query data.
It’s been a tough adjustment for businesses and marketers who had become accustomed to the wealth of information once provided by Google search query strings.
So how do you determine the best long-tail keywords without the benefit of specifics from Google? Here are just a few ways:
Yahoo/Bing keywords
Don’t forget that you can still review specific keywords from these two search engines. It’s not as comprehensive or precise, but it provides some information that fits the bill.
You should be able to find descriptive terms your readers use that you may not have considered before. You can also get an idea of the tone/reasoning behind the search. Was it phrased as a question? Did it carry a more conversational tone? Ponder these questions as you build out your keywords and content in the  future.
Keywords based on your blog content
Analyze what your top 10 most viewed blog posts are The latest in keyword research and then look at which keywords were associated
with this content. Gather these results and feed them into a keyword planning tool.
Google Keyword Planning Tool: Google Keyword Planning Tool always gets the job done. Type in your keyword, check out the results, and look for long-tail keywords that spring from the suggestions. Long-tail keywords are becoming invaluable as Google begins catering to more natural, conversational search queries.
Google related search suggestions
If you have an idea of what your keyword should be, type it into Google to get the search engine results page (SERP). When you scroll to the bottom, you’ll see Google’s “related searches.”
This displays variations on that term, showing other search queries viewers might have used to find a similar topic. One of these related searches may be more relevant or provide a more long-tail approach.
Site search bar
Having a search bar on your blog or website is helpful in several ways. If someone is using a search bar on your site, it means that person is spending time on your website looking for more content. It also means you’ll have a record of the terms people  search for with this function.
When visitors use your search bar, you get a better idea of what they expect to find from your content and might get more insight into what they’re not finding immediately.
Using Google Analytics, you’ll be able to track search queries from your website much like you would have from Google’s search tool before.
Google related search suggestions
If you have an idea of what your keyword should be, type it into Google to get the search engine results page (SERP). When you scroll to the bottom, you’ll see Google’s “related searches.”
This displays variations on that term, showing other search queries viewers might have used to find a similar topic. One of these related searches may be more relevant or provide a more long-tail approach.
Industry book titles
Many book titles these days aren’t simply chosen arbitrarily by the author. Instead, authors and publishers test out various possibilities based on the terms that attract most people interested in that subject — much like keyword research.
The titles of industry-specific books often incorporate the vocabulary used by thought leaders in the space. Where better to find key terms than from the people teaching them?
Your ideal customers are likely also learning from these material sources and will often mimic that vocabulary throughout search queries.
Go to Amazon, iTunes or Google Books and do a search for your key term. Take a look at the book titles. You’ll likely find ideas on how the terminology is used and get a better feel for the tone that resonates with your audience. Refine your findings by using a keyword tool to mash up multiple titles.

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